HOME

ABOUT BUSIMETRICS®

RESUME

HOW DO YOU KNOW YOU KNOW?

COMPETITIVE INTELLIGENCE

ECONOMIC ANALYSIS and FORECASTING Futurist Scenarios

ECONOMIC DEVELOPEMENT & PLANNING

INDUSTRY ANALYSIS

INFORMATION GATHERING & ANALYSIS Information Brokering  Business Brokering

MARKETING RESEARCH & ANALYSIS

HARBINGERS

 

COMPETITIVE  INTELLIGENCE

 

Competitive intelligence (CI), which is sometimes called business intelligence (BI), consists of not illegal methods of learning about your competition. Most CI involves what is called information mining. The information which sometimes is limited to raw data is then analyzed and assembled into a form useful to you.

 

Particular emphasis is placed on benefiting you by both:

Presenting an overall picture of the market(s) in which you are interested.

and

Filling gaps that may exist in your knowledge about the markets in which you are interested, such as what your competitors may be up to next.

 

YOU SHOULD ALSO CONSIDER THE FOLLOWING:

HOW YOU CAN BENEFIT FROM CI

Competitive intelligence can benefit you by guiding how your actions and decision-making may change the course of your organization’s history.

 

What will history say about your organization?

Below are some examples of how headlines might have been different with the kind of timely and concise competitive intelligence reports offered by James Stotter, Economics Consultant

 

 

THE HASTINGS HERALD

October 15, 1066 

ANGLOS SACK SAXONS

Senlac Hill near Hastings, England...Yesterday, in what history will surely record as an historic battle, King Harold II conquered William the Conqueror. The battle began around 9:00 a.m. (G.M.T.) and lasted until after 6:00 p.m. Harold was nearly killed in the battle. After cheating death, Harold then trapped William at Hastings and made hasty pudding of the feared foe.

 

“Just call him William the Conquered,” declared hero Harold as he paraded William back to London. As has become increasingly common in these turbulent Medieval times, protesters showed-up. Yesterday along the parade route protesters were chanting “Free Willy!”

 

Details are now coming in from embedded reporters using the new wireless technology of writing their stories on arrows which are then shot to the target news bureaus. This is called arrow to target technology, or ATT. One thing which is clear is that the key to victory was an intelligence report by James Stotter, an economist who also performs competitive intelligence work. Harold definitely felt threatened by competition. Stotter observed the Norman opponents and quickly analyzed what was happening. Unlike many reports, Stotter’s benefitted Harold by being concise and reaching him in time to be useful.

 

© James Stotter, 2004. All Rights Reserved.

 

 

 

THE INVESTORS INQUIRER

October 30, 1929

HOOVER PREVENTS CRASH IN STOCKS

New York...Yesterday what could have been a great crash turned into a technical correction. Fears of financiers jumping out of windows proved unfounded thanks to a prompt report by economist James Stotter. His consultation was key in changing what could have been a Black Tuesday into just a gray Tuesday. His concise report reached President Hoover promptly via the latest WiTy (wireless telegraphy) and was easy to read. The President benefitted by not wasting crucial time getting other opinions before taking action.  

Dems concede this virtually assures Hoover’s re-election.

© James Stotter, 2004. All Rights Reserved.

 

 

 

THE BASEBALL BUGLE

October, 1919

WHITE SOX NEARLY BLACKENED

Chicago...The World Series bound Chicago White Sox were caught planning to throw the World Series. A timely report by the economics consultant James Stotter, benefitted baseball commissioner Judge Kenesaw Mountain Landis by making him aware of Arnold ("The Big Bankroll") Rothstein's efforts to throw the coming World Series. The concise analysis by Stotter prompted Landis to sternly warn the White Sox that any suspicious errors or other activity won’t be tolerated. Says team must avoid becoming “Black Sox.” Shoeless Joe Jackson vows to play with a lot of sole.

 

© James Stotter, 2004. All Rights Reserved.

 

 

 

 

THE COWBOY COURIER

Thrilling Days of Yesteryear

Circa 1875

RANGERS ROUTE BAD GUYS

Bryant’s Gap in the mountains of west Texas...Six Texas Rangers avoided an ambush in Bryant’s Gap. The Rangers changing of tactics turned the tables on the notorious Cavandish gang. This after economics consultant James Stotter told Captain Dan Reid’s younger brother, John, “If you go in there now, you’ll be lucky if there's even a lone ranger left.” The concise and timely report benefitted Reid and the other rangers by warning them that their guide, Collins, works for Butch Cavendish.

Interviewed later, Stotter, an economist who also performs competitive intelligence work, gave a lot of credit to his subcontractor on this project, a very savvy Indian scout known simply as Tonto.

 

© James Stotter, 2004. All Rights Reserved.

 

 

 

 

 June 27, 1876

ARMY DEFEATS INDIANS

Little Big Horn, Montana Territory...Two days ago, Lt. Col. George Custer* buffaloed the great Sioux chief Sitting Bull and the Ogala tribal war lord Crazy Horse. A timely report was delivered by James Stotter, an economist who also performs competitive intelligence work. Stotter's using the new technology of the carriageless horse, overnighted his analysis to Custer via PonEx. Stotter's easy to understand report benefitted the normally brash Custer by urging him to wait for reinforcements before taking on the huge Sioux force. This proved crucial in the fierce Battle at The Little Big Horn. Although casualties were very heavy on both sides, eventually the Indians retreated and siouxed for peace.

*Custer was only a brevet (i.e.; honorary & temporary) major general during the Civil War.

© James Stotter, 2004. All Rights Reserved.

 

 

 

October 27, 1881

EARPS by K.O. AT O.K. CORRAL

Tombstone, Arizona Territory...Yesterday, the Clantons and McClaurys were outgunned by the Earp brothers and John Henry (Doc) Holliday. Wyatt Earp was reluctant to support his brother, Virgil, and take on The Cowboys. However, after listening to James Stotter point out that timing is everything, the Earps marshaled their forces to settle matters with the constantly threatening Cowboys. Stotter, an economist who also performs competitive intelligence work, noted the old Latin expression carpe’ diem. He pointed out the benefits of acting now and the improved odds due to Cowboy CEO Johnny Ringo and several other senior level Cowboys being away on business. What will likely be remembered as The Gunfight at the O.K. Corral left two Earp brothers wounded. However, the two McClaury brothers and Billy Clanton were killed. The older Clanton, Ike, ran off as bullets started flying. Though newsreel films made it seem like a long lasting feature fight, witnesses say the entire fight lasted less than 30 seconds.

© James Stotter, 2004. All Rights Reserved.